Hundreds of rubber duckies take to the river

By Amanda Kuhnert

 

Imagine 500 rubber duckies racing down the Ottaquechee River in a mad dash to the finish. Whose ducky will win the race? Come find out at Woodstock’s second annual Duck Derby on Saturday, July 21. The event helps raise money for Sustainable Woodstock’s East End project.

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At 10 a.m. spectators will gather at Elm Street Bridge, in the center of Woodstock, to watch as bucketloads of yellow duckies are dropped into the rushing waters of the Ottaquechee River. The excitement will build as the “racers” bob down the river to the finish line at East End Park. Don’t worry if your ducky loses his or her way; “duck wranglers” will stand along the shoreline and in the river to redirect any wayward racers. The first-place finishers will receive a prize donated by Woodstock businesses.

 

The great race culminates with a community Party in the Park, featuring live music, food, games, and activities for kids. Attendees are encouraged to bring a picnic lunch. Sustainable Woodstock will serve cake for dessert. The event wraps up at 1 p.m.

You can sponsor a duck for a $6 donation, or 5 ducks for $25. Tickets are available at sustainablewoodstock.org, or at Eyes on Elm, Mon Vert, and the Sustainable

Woodstock Office at 32 Pleasant Street. Check Facebook (Quack Around the Park) for the latest

updates.
SUBHED: Mushrooms and Mycorestoration

Ashley Lang, PhD candidate in the Ecology, Evolution, Ecosystems, and Society graduate program at Dartmouth College

Ashley Lang, PhD candidate in the Ecology, Evolution, Ecosystems, and Society graduate program at Dartmouth College

The next Carbon Work-Study Discussion will take place on Saturday, July 21, from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., at the Forest Center at Marsh Billings Rockefeller National Historical Park. Ashley Lang, PhD, will talk about the role of mushrooms in our forests. Lang is a candidate in the Ecology, Evolution, Ecosystems, and Society graduate program at Dartmouth College.

She will discuss the two main kinds of fungi in forests (decomposers and mycorrhizal fungi), how they operate, how they impact soil carbon storage, and how much carbon they sequester in soil compared to carbon released to the atmosphere from human activity. We will also discuss how different ecosystems have different amounts of soil carbon and why.

This workshop is part of an 8-month long series focused on managing forests for carbon storage and sequestration sponsored by Sustainable Woodstock and the National Park Service. Everyone is welcome and the workshop is free. RSVP with Zach@sustainablewoodstock.org to receive the suggested reading materials or to learn about other upcoming discussion topics on carbon.

 

 

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